Coding the Parrot Mambo Drone

The Parrot Mambo drone can be coded via the Tynker App (iOS, Android) or via Swift Playground. If you choose Tynker, then you may need to enroll students (at cost) into their stunt pilot course. The Swift Playground, Parrot Education Accessory is free and will lead students through coding the drone rather than dragging and dropping blocks (as with Tynker).

I am currently working with a year 9 class, with an emphasis on developing algorithms, using the problem solving project sequence below.


DEFINE

  • team building
  • team work plan
  • design brief

DISCOVER

  • how to fly the drone
  • how to program the drone
  • identify what you need to know and the skills you need to complete the project

DESIGN

  • what is an algorithm
  • what is pseudocode
  • algorithm design

DELIVER

  • code the drone
  • publish a project portfolio

DEBRIEF

  • evaluate process and production skills

Resources

 


Using drones is a good opportunity to develop student ‘soft skills’ such as collaboration and communication because it forces you to work in a larger space than a normal classroom and with limited resources. I normally work in a computer lab, but needed to move to the library where the class could access the space as well as ipads. Back in the normal classroom, students are able to work on other aspects of their project.

You could extend on this and have students design and build the obstacle course. I started off on this path but realised that I needed a proper makerspace, with art supplies, storage for student projects and project spaces for teams to ‘make a mess’. If you have a makerspace, maybe give my  Drone Game Board Unit Plan a go.

Creating and Communicating with ICT using Weebly

In the Australian Curriculum, students develop Information and Communication Technology (ICT) capability as they learn within and across disciplines.

ACARA ICT Capability
ACARA ICT Capability

Weebly for Education can be employed to compile information together in a different way or collaboratively constructing knowledge; as well as sharing and publishing the products of their learning. There a many other free online systems for creating websites, but this is the only one that is not blocked by our firewall. This is a great system to use for a Mulitimodal response from your students. Why not build this into your next assessment task.

Have your students view the quickstart guide below. From there, the system is very intuitive and will require very little input from you. Why not have them work in collaborative pairs and help each other on a shared artifact of learning.

 

 

 

 

 

Learning Design and Management for Queensland Schools

Linked below is a  guide to Learning Design and Management, using Queensland Standards Elaborations as a starting point for Proficiency Scales and then auditing the learning sequence against the Australian Curriculum General Capabilities.

I have previously created a guide that I would describe as a qualitative approach to Learning Design and Management, because Proficiency Scales, in the guide, are designed to move up a Cognitive Taxonomy. In this guide, Proficiency Scales are adapted from QCAA Standards Elaborations and I would describe this as roughly a quantitative approach.

LearningDesignManagement

 

On The Road to Project Based Learning (PBL)

Or Not Quite PBL

“The road” by Rick Turoczy is licensed under CC BY 2.0 ]

I’m hoping that this is a “before” snapshot and later I will be blogging the “after” version; because I’m just not there yet. Many people and organisations, such as BIE, Edutopia,  teachthought,  gettingsmart  and  globaldigitalcitizens,  stress the importance of inquiry and a student-centred approach to PBL. There has also been some work done on the difference between projects and project-based learning and continua to consider for effective PBL.

 

[Effective PBL Continua by Peter Skillen & Brenda Sherry is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.]

Context

In my context, the culture of Teaching and Learning is very traditionally based. Students learn and behave in an environment that is teacher-centred, fixed and synchronous. There is very little collaboration and so students don’t have the interpersonal skills they need for PBL. There is very little personalization or student agency and so students aren’t used to taking responsibility for their learning and don’t have the skills they need to manage their own learning; and so they tend to be passive rather than active learners. Lastly, there has not been an emphasis on 21st century fluencies or capabilities and so students do not possess the information fluencies they need for  inquiry.

I surmise, that because of this prevailing culture, I have not been successful in my attempts to have students collaborate in their learning and exercise voice and choice. Typically, the moment students realize that they are no longer tethered to their chairs in a seating plan, they have a tendency to become giddy and unfocused (I have even witnessed a student doing cartwheels). Then, even though I have provided all the resources and scaffolding they need, they do not engage unless I explicitly or directly teach them as passively as possible; such is their expectation.

Never the less, I intend on moving forward. So far, my PBL looks like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Locus of control

Before: At the moment, I initiate the project, but there is some latitude. For example, a project may revolve around developing a website for a client and the client has specific needs that need to be met, so the way students solve the problem will be different. However, students still rely on me to help them manage their projects, with me setting milestones and deadlines. Students are further supported with extensive scaffolding and templates.

After: I think that I need to work my way from setting the theme of the project to allowing students to engage their passions and interests. However, for students to operate successfully at the other end of the spectrum, they need to take responsibility for their learning. Therefore, I will work my way towards giving students more autonomy, in parallel with training them to personalize and manage their learning. The approaches that I could use, with increasing locus of control to students are:

1. Creating a theme or context – students solve a clearly defined problem with a restricted scope. In my teaching area this would be designing and developing a technical solution such as a website or an app.

2. Hack or remix something that already exists – in this situation students could choose something to modify but it may turn out to be too difficult, so I still need to restrict the domain. Students will still have some latitude within these restrictions though. This option works well in my area because students can follow some instructions to build something and then add their own modifications. For example, could learn how to control LEDs with an arduino microprocessor and then create their own wearable T-shirt with flashing logo.

3. Tie project to a competition or challenge – there are many competitions and challenges that are essentially PBL challenges. These often have scope for student choice.

4. Real world client – not only is there a level of choice here but also motivation. When students have a level of accountability to a real person its a whole new ball game.

5. Free play – this is where students can really engage with their passions and interests.

In their book, Hacking Project Based Learning: 10 Easy Steps to PBL and Inquiry in the Classroom, Ross Cooper and Erin Murphy encourage teachers to choose a track:

1. Set-Product Track (most restrictive) – produce a set product or thing.

2. Problem Track (medium restrictive) – initiate project by presenting students with a problem or scenario.

3. Open-Ended Track (least restrictive) – the only restrictions here are the learning goals.

Questioning

Before: I do all the questioning here. My scaffolding mainly consists of design questions. Even when having students identify “other things to consider”, I use questions. My students aren’t delving very deeply into learning through self-directed inquiry.

After: I need to build up my students’ information fluency and inquiry skills. I can do that by embedding the ICT Capability of Investigating with ICT into my project scaffolds or explicitly train students in the process and then encourage them to use these skill to ask questions and develop their solutions. I can also take up the advice from Ross Cooper and Erin Murphy in their book Hacking Project Based Learning: 10 Easy Steps to PBL and Inquiry in the Classroom and qft pg 24 and class-wide umbrella questions pg 68

Collaboration

Before: This rarely happens explicitly; often students will collaborate in a spontaneous way but this is not part of the process. The main reason for this is summative assessment, where it is difficult to determine which evidence has been generated by individual students. For this reason, on projects that are team-based, different aspects are nominated as team or individual.

After: A key hurdle seems to be summative assessment. In Reinventing Project-Based Learning: Your Field Guide to Real-World Projects in the Digital Age (2nd Edition) by Suzie Boss & Jane Krauss, it is suggested that a final performance task that requires students to apply what they have learned is one approach that can be taken. However, my projects lead students through an engineering cycle, resulting in a final product. Therefore, I will keep with team and/or individual milestone tasks but may add an ongoing reflective learning task, such as a development log.

The other hurdle is collaboration skills, or the lack of. Again, Hacking Project Based Learning: 10 Easy Steps to PBL and Inquiry in the Classroom pg 29 has some good guidance on how to teach these skills.

Content

Before: Again, I scaffold very heavily here and provide the content.

After: Definitely need to build up my students’ information fluency and inquiry skills. I can do that by embedding the ICT Capability of Investigating with ICT into my project scaffolds or explicitly train students in the process and then encourage them to use these skill to ask questions and find their own content links.

Knowledge

Before: Not doing too badly here as students do a fair amount of analysis, evaluation, design and creation. I do use blogs and wikis so that students can share and evaluate each others’ work.

After: This could be made a bit more visible by assessing the level of sharing and evaluating between students.

Purpose

Before: The majority of my projects do have a real world context and students are forced to seek out a client for some.

After: I need to include a client in all projects and source a real-world mentor for either groups of the whole class.

 

Links

http://www.gettingsmart.com/2016/06/project-activity-pbl-cousins/

http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/feb08/vol65/num05/Project-Based_Learning.aspx

http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/feb08/vol65/num05/Project-Based_Learning.aspx

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-04-23-why-project-based-learning-hasn-t-gone-mainstream-and-what-we-can-do-about-it

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/project-based-learning/a-better-list-of-ideas-for-project-based-learning/

https://opentextbc.ca/teachinginadigitalage/chapter/4-4-models-for-teaching-by-doing/

https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/07/19/whats-the-best-way-to-practice-project-based-learning/

 

 

Explicit Instruction and Not Quite Blended (NQB) Classrooms on the Road to BYOD

“BYOD” by AJ LEON is licensed under CC BY 2.0

 

BYOD So Far….

Federal Government funding in Australia for a 1:1 ratio of devices to students is long gone. This has left most school in the situation of having something like a 1:5 ratio, of school owned devices,  that they can barely sustain. There has been an attempt, by most schools, to address the shortfall with a Bring your Own Device (BYOD) program. This has largely been unsuccessful; a strawpoll of schools around the region suggests a less than 10% uptake. Even in places where students have multiple devices at home, they rarely bring them to school. When asked why they generally respond, “My teacher doesn’t do anything with it.”

Why is it so?

The main problem is the focus on the device and the technology, rather than the pedagogy. As articulated by Michael Fullan, “Pedagogy is the driver, technology is the accelerator.” So, when we were given devices but no training or the development of a culture of growth and reforms to our practice, we did the only thing we knew and substituted this tool for something we were already doing. Internet connected devices certainly are useful for ‘research’ or other online content. For a variety of reasons we did not engaged in practices that let us see how transformational technology can be in the process of learning. Meanwhile, students and their parents have not developed a value for technology as an indispensable device for learning.

 

 

Where to now?

The only way devices are going to make it through your classroom door is by students bringing them. Parents will not provide devices and students will not bring them until they both value them for learning. Therefore, we need to make the first moves and begin to demonstrate the value that technology adds to learning. We can do that by shifting to Blended Learning.

What Will the Shift to Blended Learning Look Like

Blended Learning is a mix of face-to-face and online learning, along a learning path or sequence. Blended Learning is also Personalized, so students have an element of agency over the pace, place and path their learning takes. Before we leap straight into this and because we don’t have devices, we need to start with ‘Not Quite Blended’. This will then be the foundation we need to journey all the way to learning opportunities afforded be Inquiry-Based Learning such as Project-Based Learning.

Not Quite Blended

The major difference with this approach is that it does not have all the systems and processes you need to Personalize learning. This is more of an explicit approach rather than an implicit one, so students are more likely to be consumers of information rather than producers of knew knowledge; you might post content online and guide students through it rather than guide students through an inquiry process. At this stage, technology is used to enhance pedagogy with Substitution and Augmentation (SAMR Model), with some creep into transformation. This may be in the form of starting to use the 4C’s of 21st Century Learning:

  • Communicate – students might blog their learning and receive feedback
  • Collaborate – students may develop shared artifacts of learning with wikis, blogs or other web 2.o technologies such as Padlet.
  • Critical Thinking – this might be made more visible in combination with Communicate and Collaborate strategies
  • Creativity – instead of the product of learning presented as text, other media may be used in creative ways. Students may also synthesize knew knowledge via inquiry learning.

How can I do This with Explicit Instruction?

If you have read this far, then you already know that it’s all about the Pedagogy! The Pedagogical Framework we use is Explicit Instruction (Archer & Hughes 2011) overlayed with the Gradual Release of Responsibility:

Explicit Instruction

Warm-up ideas

  • Play a youtube video as students enter
  • Pose a ‘Socratic’ question
  • Give a short pre-test using Kahoot
  • Have students play a game
  • Project an image at the start of a lesson
  • Demonstrate a physical behaviour such as a chemical reaction and ask ‘why is it so?’
  • Read an interesting quote from a famous person.
  • Analyse a tag cloud of the topic for high frequency words
  • Hold a Seed Discussion online
  • Have students post an Anticipation Guide

WALT/WILF ideas

  • Always have these accessible 24/7 in your Virtual Classroom (Blackboard for senior, Edmodo for Junior).
  • Have students track their learning, either on paper or online.
  • Try using a KWL, either on paper or preferably online (have students post this in their online journals).

I Do ideas

  • Create a Virtual Classroom (Blackboard for senior, Edmodo for Junior)to curate ALL content
  • Reduce cognitive load for students by sourcing multi-modal content
  • Let the content do the “chalk and talk” for you. ie: there is probably a youtube or teacher tube clip out there that will say it better and students can watch it several times until they get it.
  • If you do “chalk and talk”, record it and upload it to provide a bank for review/revision. You can then build on this to ‘flip’ your classroom. ie: have students review the material for homework and then go straight into the ‘we do’ step.
  • There are a heap of online learning activities , around content and input experiences, that you can access.
  • Why not explain a concept with someone else’s animation.
  • Chunk‘ content into digestible bites
  • Identify critical input experiences
  • Manage response rates with Kahoot, Padlet and a host of other technologies.

WE DO ideas

YOU DO ideas

REVIEW & REFLECTION ideas

WHAT IS THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY FOR ME TO DEVELOP THESE SKILLS?

1. Develop a Growth Mindset

2. Deliberate Practice

In Hattie’s “Teachers Make a Difference What is the research evidence?”, Teachers accounted for 30% of the variance.

The research also tells us that Teacher reflective practice leads to increased pedagogical skill which results in increased student achievement.

Deliberate Practice is about refinement of practice over time:

3. Couple Deliberate Practice with a Collaborative PLC Cycle, for you and your colleagues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gamify Your Classroom With Kahoot and Other Online Formative Assessment & Response Systems

Why Kahoot?

Kahoot is great for:

  • Introducing new topics
  • Review, Revice & Reinforce
  • Formative Assessment and Checks for Understanding
  • Surveying to initiate discussion and debate

Kahoot is available on desktops and all mobile devices as an app, so one way or another, students have options for access to a device that they can use (BYOD). This is a great stepping stone to inspire students and parents to value technology for learning. Actually, students love this, so don’t be surprised if devices flow into your classroom if you regularly use this as part of your exit routine.

How it Works

Powerful Ways to Use Kahoot

Alternative Online Systems

 

 

5 Ways to Use Padlet In Your Blended Classroom

Why use Padlet?

Even a basic use of Padlet ticks most of the 4C’s for 21st Century Learning: Communicate, Collaborate, Critical Thinking and Creativity. In terms of integrating digital technology in your class, it is at the Transformation end of the SAMR Model. From a pragmatic point of view, it is also a great vehicle to use to inspire students and their parents to value technology for learning and start bringing in their own device (BYOD).

How does Padlet Work?

The best answer to this question is to read the Padlet FAQ. Otherwise, it can be used on desktops, android and apple platforms; so your students should have reasonable access to some kind of device for learning.

How can I use it?

1. Word Wall

Word Walls have multiple uses and pedagogical intents, such as:

When these are just in the physical classroom, then they can only be used in a synchronous way and are usually not sustained beyond the timeframe of a unit of work. There is also limited opportunities to update and refine these as learning progresses. When these are posted online, however, the reverse is true.

View this example

2. Increasing Response Rates

Normally, gaining responses from a class involves the teacher asking questions and recording responses on a whiteboard. This may be effective for you if you pair it with strategies to increase student response rates. With Padlet, you can have a response from all students.

3. Collaborative Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking is usually not a collaborative affair beyond very small groups of students. You could arm expert jigsaws with butchers paper and have them fill in a graphic organizer and then post the finished collaborative artifact of learning on a spare wall. Or, you could use Padlet.

View this compare and contrast example

View this Evaluation example

4. ePortfolios

Folio assessment tasks are great for students to collect evidence of their knowledge and skills, even when they are on paper. However, paper-based folios are difficult to share within and beyond the classroom. This means that students miss out on feedback from peers and others to inform their learning.

ePortfolios improve on this by allowing a public reflection, evaluation and sharing of learning. Students can also Personalize their learning with “voice and choice” because they can determine what they need to learn, how they will learn and present evidence of their learning. This is the main reason that ePortfolios are utilized for Problem-Based, Challenge-Based and Project-Based learning; where students determine what the problem is, decide how they will solve it and then present their solution.

Padlet has upgraded its technology and now you can drag and drop files to organise an ePortfolio.

5. Exit tickets

These are a great formative check for understanding and can be used as part of your feedback for visible learning.

View this example

Padlet Alternatives

Stories From the Field

My colleague, Wendy Coleman, uses Padlet to give her students anywhere, anytime access to learning activities and resources.  Students are then able to interact with learning resources at their own time and pace.

These Padlets are password protected, so she also sends these to parents so that they can support students at home. Further to this, they all have an associated QR code.

Wendy tells me that she likes the visual nature of padlet and the way it is so easy to post a variety of content. As you can see from the snapshot below, Padlet is quite versatile.

 

An Easy Way to Track Learning in a Contemporary Classroom

“The three forms” by Christopher Michel is licensed under CC BY 2.0

 

1.Define Learning Goals in answer to the question: “What do we want students to learn?”

For this I create a Proficiency Scale, for a topic,  so that students and I can track learning within the topic’s learning sequence. This also provides both the cognitions and qualities required for success at each stage of mastery. In practice, it looks like this:

WALT/ WILF Scale Standard 4 Standard 3.5 Standard 3 Standard 2 Standard 1
Implementation and evaluation The student work has the following characteristics:

Use of a variety of complex technical skills and resources to present an efficient and effective solution:

  • Import files
  • Strokes, fills and vectors
  • Text
  • Shape tweens
  • Symbols
  • Motion tweens
  • Publishing
The student work has the following characteristics:

Use of a variety of technical skills and resources to present an efficient solution:

  • Import files
  • Strokes, fills and vectors
  • Text
  • Shape tweens
  • Symbols
The student work has the following characteristics:

Use of technical skills and resources to present a solution:

  • Import files
  • Strokes, fills and vectors
  • Text
The student work has the following characteristics:

Use of basic technical skills and resources to present a partial solution:

The student work has the following characteristics:

Use of isolated technical skills to produce an output:

The easy part is that this is lifted straight out of the syllabus and I have just added lists of content as a way of adding a quantity dimension to the descriptors. The P-10 equivalent of this are the Standards Elaborations provided by the QCAA. So, now my scale has cognition, quality and quantity. Instead of A-E, I use a 4-point scale, with a B being roughly 3.5. The reason for this is that I want to use this for formative assessment and not as a final summative grade.

2. Design Instructional Strategies in answer to the question: “How can we design learning to support student engagement and progression?”

Both engagement and progression can be achieved with Personalized Learning strategies. At the beginning of the topic I introduce students to the WALTS and WILFs and have them set goals (feedup) in their online Learning Journals (Blackboard). They do this by copying the scale and highlighting where they wish to end up. Then, as they master the skills at each level, they highlight in a different colour (feedback/feedforward), until they reach their goal. This is mostly a self-assessment, but I facilitate by conferencing with students about how they are going and give them feedback as well.

3. Assess Learning

This is the really easy part, because students have managed this for me.  Remember, differentiation is something a teacher does (monitor learning and re-design for different learner needs), while personalization is something a student does. Technology has also enabled this process of personalized formative assessment. Then, in a PLC meeting, it is easy to flip through student journals and collaboratively evaluate the effectiveness of instructional strategies and the progress of students.

Additional Strategies

The Single Point Rubric

These are useful for students to use in order to understand and demonstrate the level of mastery they have achieved and to decide if they have achieved their goal. This could also be incorporated into a portfolio reflection and could be annotated in student learning journals in the same post as their learning goal tracking process.

Single Point rubrics work by having students create three columns, with the goal in the middle and, the evidence that they have met the goal on the left and any concerns they have on the right. Remember, this is more a self-evaluation, rather than a reflection and students need to “argue their case” for mastery based on evidence from their work.