Digital Content Linked To The Australian Curriculum: Start Using Scootle Today!

Introduction

Scootle (http://www.scootle.edu.au) provides access to more than 20,000 items of digital curriculum content published by Education Services Australia. Most of these link directly from The Australian Curriculum website. For example, when seeking resources for ACSSU113, there is an obvious link to Discover resources at scootle:

Otherwise, by going directly to scootle, teachers can find interactive learning objects, images, audio files and movie clips via browse, search and filter technology. Then they can create personal lists of favourite resources for quick access.

Discovering Learning Content

You can find the content that you need by performing either a Basic or Advanced search. My advice is to consult the Scootle User Guide as this is a skill in itself, but one worth investing some time in. Another place to find help is within the Scootle users demonstrations, Education Services Australia, YouTube playlist. Again, the best way to discover content is to find content by Australian Curriculum. Then your search will yield all digital curriculum resources that fall within the curriculum content and year level that you are seeking.

Learning Paths

Probably the best feature on the scootle site is the ability to create and manage Learning Paths. A learning path includes a sequence of learning content, interwoven with teacher comments and descriptions and delivered to students either online (by use of the student PIN) or offline (by using an exported learning path spreadsheet or PDF). This system stops just short of being a Learning Management System (LMS) such as Blackboard. I would still use it to sequence my learning and link to it via my Virtual Classroom. I can’t emphasize enough what a great system for sequencing learning this is. If you are contemplating using it, I highly recommend consulting the Scootle User Guide and the Scootle users demonstrations, Education Services Australia, YouTube playlist.

Collaborative Activity

Learning in a collaborative or interdependent way provides students with a social and intellectual context for greater levels of critical thinking, motivation, peer review and self-reflection. These opportunities are outlined in the ACARA General Capabilities.

ACARA General Capabilities

Scootle’s has big range of collaborative activities in an environment where students collaborate to build understanding, express their learning and receive  feedback. Some of the features of Scootle’s live workspace that support collaboration are:

• a dynamic environment – Students can add their own text, comments and online resources, and rearrange the workspace to build a structured, collaborative response to a task.
• feedback – Ongoing feedback is available from the teacher at any time for student reflection and meaningful formative assessment.
• online identity – Students choose nicknames and avatars for themselves in the live workspace.
• Scootle chat – Chat in real time, with all discussions recorded and available for feedback and reference for students and teacher.
• file upload and sharing – Students can upload their own files and resources to attach to a learning activity

Assessment resource

Many of the digital content items available are assessment resources. These can be used as a check for understanding as part of a Learning Path. I have also seen them used in a summative way as well. I would use these because they are linked directly to the Learning Goals of my content area of the Australian Curriculum and therefore rigorous. It also means that I don’t have to create an assessment item, print it out and mark it as it is all online and automated.

Start using Scootle today!

 

 

 

Creating and Communicating with ICT using Weebly

In the Australian Curriculum, students develop Information and Communication Technology (ICT) capability as they learn within and across disciplines.

ACARA ICT Capability
ACARA ICT Capability

Weebly for Education can be employed to compile information together in a different way or collaboratively constructing knowledge; as well as sharing and publishing the products of their learning. There a many other free online systems for creating websites, but this is the only one that is not blocked by our firewall. This is a great system to use for a Mulitimodal response from your students. Why not build this into your next assessment task.

Have your students view the quickstart guide below. From there, the system is very intuitive and will require very little input from you. Why not have them work in collaborative pairs and help each other on a shared artifact of learning.

 

 

 

 

 

Learning Design and Management for Queensland Schools

Linked below is a  guide to Learning Design and Management, using Queensland Standards Elaborations as a starting point for Proficiency Scales and then auditing the learning sequence against the Australian Curriculum General Capabilities.

I have previously created a guide that I would describe as a qualitative approach to Learning Design and Management, because Proficiency Scales, in the guide, are designed to move up a Cognitive Taxonomy. In this guide, Proficiency Scales are adapted from QCAA Standards Elaborations and I would describe this as roughly a quantitative approach.

LearningDesignManagement

 

WALT and WILF the Easy and Rigorous Way

The QCAA has already developed the basis for WALT and WILF within the senior syllabus standards and P-10 Australian Curriculum elaborations; with cognitions and qualities for each standard A-E. Why not use them!

For example:

Cognitions are highlighted in yellow and discriminating qualities are highlighted in blue.

These standards can be used in formative assessment by modifying them to add quantity and content dimensions. In the example below, I have added the quantity of content that I am looking for.

I have students set goals and track their learning by highlighting these scales.

What about Higher Order Thinking Standards?

Analysis

You probably could still add a content/quantity descriptor, for Analysis, as the standards are usually of the form:

Health Education

However, if you do want to provide more rigor, then I suggest aligning the skill of Analysis to Marzano’s Taxonomy. In this case Analysis increases in complexity from Matching at the bottom end to Specifying at the top.

[Adapted from The New Taxonomy (Marzano and Kendall, 2007) and Marzano Taxonomy – Thinking Processes with Design Verbs ]

So, using this, to be proficient with a score of 3 or at standard, students can Match or Classify. To score a 3.5, students could Generalize and Specifying could score a 4. Therefore, a student Proficiency scale for Health Education, becomes:

Evaluation

This is an example Proficiency Scale for the Learning Goal “I can EVALUATE..” Notice how it ‘climbs’ up Bloom’s taxonomy almost exactly.

This assessment criterion for English is not too bad as it too recognised that a poor evaluation is closer to an explanation or analysis. Most just use the qualifier discerning or thorough evaluation.

I would value add to your existing criteria by adding:

2 = explain/identify

3= evaluation

3.5 = justify decisions

4 = make recommendations

Design/Create

This thinking skill tends to be wide and deep and this is reflected in the range of standards across subjects:

English

Ancient History

Biology

So, leave these as is or use simpler language. You can then increase students’ familiarity and understanding of these by unpacking them and providing tangible examples.

How to use them

I develop these at the beginning of a topic and then just point to the place in the criteria sheet that relates to a lesson or learning activity. At the end of a unit, these also become my marking criteria (front-loaded assessment).

I have students set goals and track their learning by highlighting these scales (self feedback). I also use them when conferencing with students (feedback) and students can use them for peer feedback.

This is one I have used recently: WALT-WILF