Digital Content Linked To The Australian Curriculum: Start Using Scootle Today!

Introduction

Scootle (http://www.scootle.edu.au) provides access to more than 20,000 items of digital curriculum content published by Education Services Australia. Most of these link directly from The Australian Curriculum website. For example, when seeking resources for ACSSU113, there is an obvious link to Discover resources at scootle:

Otherwise, by going directly to scootle, teachers can find interactive learning objects, images, audio files and movie clips via browse, search and filter technology. Then they can create personal lists of favourite resources for quick access.

Discovering Learning Content

You can find the content that you need by performing either a Basic or Advanced search. My advice is to consult the Scootle User Guide as this is a skill in itself, but one worth investing some time in. Another place to find help is within the Scootle users demonstrations, Education Services Australia, YouTube playlist. Again, the best way to discover content is to find content by Australian Curriculum. Then your search will yield all digital curriculum resources that fall within the curriculum content and year level that you are seeking.

Learning Paths

Probably the best feature on the scootle site is the ability to create and manage Learning Paths. A learning path includes a sequence of learning content, interwoven with teacher comments and descriptions and delivered to students either online (by use of the student PIN) or offline (by using an exported learning path spreadsheet or PDF). This system stops just short of being a Learning Management System (LMS) such as Blackboard. I would still use it to sequence my learning and link to it via my Virtual Classroom. I can’t emphasize enough what a great system for sequencing learning this is. If you are contemplating using it, I highly recommend consulting the Scootle User Guide and the Scootle users demonstrations, Education Services Australia, YouTube playlist.

Collaborative Activity

Learning in a collaborative or interdependent way provides students with a social and intellectual context for greater levels of critical thinking, motivation, peer review and self-reflection. These opportunities are outlined in the ACARA General Capabilities.

ACARA General Capabilities

Scootle’s has big range of collaborative activities in an environment where students collaborate to build understanding, express their learning and receive  feedback. Some of the features of Scootle’s live workspace that support collaboration are:

• a dynamic environment – Students can add their own text, comments and online resources, and rearrange the workspace to build a structured, collaborative response to a task.
• feedback – Ongoing feedback is available from the teacher at any time for student reflection and meaningful formative assessment.
• online identity – Students choose nicknames and avatars for themselves in the live workspace.
• Scootle chat – Chat in real time, with all discussions recorded and available for feedback and reference for students and teacher.
• file upload and sharing – Students can upload their own files and resources to attach to a learning activity

Assessment resource

Many of the digital content items available are assessment resources. These can be used as a check for understanding as part of a Learning Path. I have also seen them used in a summative way as well. I would use these because they are linked directly to the Learning Goals of my content area of the Australian Curriculum and therefore rigorous. It also means that I don’t have to create an assessment item, print it out and mark it as it is all online and automated.

Start using Scootle today!

 

 

 

Creating and Communicating with ICT using Weebly

In the Australian Curriculum, students develop Information and Communication Technology (ICT) capability as they learn within and across disciplines.

ACARA ICT Capability
ACARA ICT Capability

Weebly for Education can be employed to compile information together in a different way or collaboratively constructing knowledge; as well as sharing and publishing the products of their learning. There a many other free online systems for creating websites, but this is the only one that is not blocked by our firewall. This is a great system to use for a Mulitimodal response from your students. Why not build this into your next assessment task.

Have your students view the quickstart guide below. From there, the system is very intuitive and will require very little input from you. Why not have them work in collaborative pairs and help each other on a shared artifact of learning.

 

 

 

 

 

Explicit Instruction and Not Quite Blended (NQB) Classrooms on the Road to BYOD

“BYOD” by AJ LEON is licensed under CC BY 2.0

 

BYOD So Far….

Federal Government funding in Australia for a 1:1 ratio of devices to students is long gone. This has left most school in the situation of having something like a 1:5 ratio, of school owned devices,  that they can barely sustain. There has been an attempt, by most schools, to address the shortfall with a Bring your Own Device (BYOD) program. This has largely been unsuccessful; a strawpoll of schools around the region suggests a less than 10% uptake. Even in places where students have multiple devices at home, they rarely bring them to school. When asked why they generally respond, “My teacher doesn’t do anything with it.”

Why is it so?

The main problem is the focus on the device and the technology, rather than the pedagogy. As articulated by Michael Fullan, “Pedagogy is the driver, technology is the accelerator.” So, when we were given devices but no training or the development of a culture of growth and reforms to our practice, we did the only thing we knew and substituted this tool for something we were already doing. Internet connected devices certainly are useful for ‘research’ or other online content. For a variety of reasons we did not engaged in practices that let us see how transformational technology can be in the process of learning. Meanwhile, students and their parents have not developed a value for technology as an indispensable device for learning.

 

 

Where to now?

The only way devices are going to make it through your classroom door is by students bringing them. Parents will not provide devices and students will not bring them until they both value them for learning. Therefore, we need to make the first moves and begin to demonstrate the value that technology adds to learning. We can do that by shifting to Blended Learning.

What Will the Shift to Blended Learning Look Like

Blended Learning is a mix of face-to-face and online learning, along a learning path or sequence. Blended Learning is also Personalized, so students have an element of agency over the pace, place and path their learning takes. Before we leap straight into this and because we don’t have devices, we need to start with ‘Not Quite Blended’. This will then be the foundation we need to journey all the way to learning opportunities afforded be Inquiry-Based Learning such as Project-Based Learning.

Not Quite Blended

The major difference with this approach is that it does not have all the systems and processes you need to Personalize learning. This is more of an explicit approach rather than an implicit one, so students are more likely to be consumers of information rather than producers of knew knowledge; you might post content online and guide students through it rather than guide students through an inquiry process. At this stage, technology is used to enhance pedagogy with Substitution and Augmentation (SAMR Model), with some creep into transformation. This may be in the form of starting to use the 4C’s of 21st Century Learning:

  • Communicate – students might blog their learning and receive feedback
  • Collaborate – students may develop shared artifacts of learning with wikis, blogs or other web 2.o technologies such as Padlet.
  • Critical Thinking – this might be made more visible in combination with Communicate and Collaborate strategies
  • Creativity – instead of the product of learning presented as text, other media may be used in creative ways. Students may also synthesize knew knowledge via inquiry learning.

How can I do This with Explicit Instruction?

If you have read this far, then you already know that it’s all about the Pedagogy! The Pedagogical Framework we use is Explicit Instruction (Archer & Hughes 2011) overlayed with the Gradual Release of Responsibility:

Explicit Instruction

Warm-up ideas

  • Play a youtube video as students enter
  • Pose a ‘Socratic’ question
  • Give a short pre-test using Kahoot
  • Have students play a game
  • Project an image at the start of a lesson
  • Demonstrate a physical behaviour such as a chemical reaction and ask ‘why is it so?’
  • Read an interesting quote from a famous person.
  • Analyse a tag cloud of the topic for high frequency words
  • Hold a Seed Discussion online
  • Have students post an Anticipation Guide

WALT/WILF ideas

  • Always have these accessible 24/7 in your Virtual Classroom (Blackboard for senior, Edmodo for Junior).
  • Have students track their learning, either on paper or online.
  • Try using a KWL, either on paper or preferably online (have students post this in their online journals).

I Do ideas

  • Create a Virtual Classroom (Blackboard for senior, Edmodo for Junior)to curate ALL content
  • Reduce cognitive load for students by sourcing multi-modal content
  • Let the content do the “chalk and talk” for you. ie: there is probably a youtube or teacher tube clip out there that will say it better and students can watch it several times until they get it.
  • If you do “chalk and talk”, record it and upload it to provide a bank for review/revision. You can then build on this to ‘flip’ your classroom. ie: have students review the material for homework and then go straight into the ‘we do’ step.
  • There are a heap of online learning activities , around content and input experiences, that you can access.
  • Why not explain a concept with someone else’s animation.
  • Chunk‘ content into digestible bites
  • Identify critical input experiences
  • Manage response rates with Kahoot, Padlet and a host of other technologies.

WE DO ideas

YOU DO ideas

REVIEW & REFLECTION ideas

WHAT IS THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY FOR ME TO DEVELOP THESE SKILLS?

1. Develop a Growth Mindset

2. Deliberate Practice

In Hattie’s “Teachers Make a Difference What is the research evidence?”, Teachers accounted for 30% of the variance.

The research also tells us that Teacher reflective practice leads to increased pedagogical skill which results in increased student achievement.

Deliberate Practice is about refinement of practice over time:

3. Couple Deliberate Practice with a Collaborative PLC Cycle, for you and your colleagues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Ways to Use Padlet In Your Blended Classroom

Why use Padlet?

Even a basic use of Padlet ticks most of the 4C’s for 21st Century Learning: Communicate, Collaborate, Critical Thinking and Creativity. In terms of integrating digital technology in your class, it is at the Transformation end of the SAMR Model. From a pragmatic point of view, it is also a great vehicle to use to inspire students and their parents to value technology for learning and start bringing in their own device (BYOD).

How does Padlet Work?

The best answer to this question is to read the Padlet FAQ. Otherwise, it can be used on desktops, android and apple platforms; so your students should have reasonable access to some kind of device for learning.

How can I use it?

1. Word Wall

Word Walls have multiple uses and pedagogical intents, such as:

When these are just in the physical classroom, then they can only be used in a synchronous way and are usually not sustained beyond the timeframe of a unit of work. There is also limited opportunities to update and refine these as learning progresses. When these are posted online, however, the reverse is true.

View this example

2. Increasing Response Rates

Normally, gaining responses from a class involves the teacher asking questions and recording responses on a whiteboard. This may be effective for you if you pair it with strategies to increase student response rates. With Padlet, you can have a response from all students.

3. Collaborative Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking is usually not a collaborative affair beyond very small groups of students. You could arm expert jigsaws with butchers paper and have them fill in a graphic organizer and then post the finished collaborative artifact of learning on a spare wall. Or, you could use Padlet.

View this compare and contrast example

View this Evaluation example

4. ePortfolios

Folio assessment tasks are great for students to collect evidence of their knowledge and skills, even when they are on paper. However, paper-based folios are difficult to share within and beyond the classroom. This means that students miss out on feedback from peers and others to inform their learning.

ePortfolios improve on this by allowing a public reflection, evaluation and sharing of learning. Students can also Personalize their learning with “voice and choice” because they can determine what they need to learn, how they will learn and present evidence of their learning. This is the main reason that ePortfolios are utilized for Problem-Based, Challenge-Based and Project-Based learning; where students determine what the problem is, decide how they will solve it and then present their solution.

Padlet has upgraded its technology and now you can drag and drop files to organise an ePortfolio.

5. Exit tickets

These are a great formative check for understanding and can be used as part of your feedback for visible learning.

View this example

Padlet Alternatives

Stories From the Field

My colleague, Wendy Coleman, uses Padlet to give her students anywhere, anytime access to learning activities and resources.  Students are then able to interact with learning resources at their own time and pace.

These Padlets are password protected, so she also sends these to parents so that they can support students at home. Further to this, they all have an associated QR code.

Wendy tells me that she likes the visual nature of padlet and the way it is so easy to post a variety of content. As you can see from the snapshot below, Padlet is quite versatile.